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Lincoln School
Family Handbook
2013-2014



Mission Statement


Lincoln School is an independent college preparatory school for girls where high academic and ethical standards challenge students from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 to nurture their special talents and interests. Drawing on its Quaker heritage, Lincoln School focuses on character and values, as well as knowledge, simplicity, cooperation, mutual respect, and nonviolent resolution of conflict. The aims of a Lincoln education are confidence, achievement, a commitment to service, and a life-long love of learning.
–Board of Trustees, 2007

Statement on Diversity

We believe that diversity is an essential part of education. Reflecting its Quaker heritage, Lincoln School strives to develop in each student an appreciation of her uniqueness, a respect for others, and a sense of responsibility for the community at large. At Lincoln, we recognize that there is diversity in the languages we speak, the colors of our skin, our genders, ages, traditions, family structures, and our financial and educational resources. Our separate heritages, beliefs, and choices of expression help to define us as individuals; our commitment to learning about one another and the larger world unites us as a community. We acknowledge and explore our differences with enthusiasm and respect for the dignity of each individual.
In our recruitment of students, faculty and staff, Lincoln School strives to create a community that reflects the increasing diversity of the region in which we reside. In our curriculum, in ways that are developmentally appropriate, we study race, ethnicity, family structure, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and economic differences. In our assemblies, special events, guest lectures, and activities we work to further our commitment to diversity.

While the family is the primary source of customs, traditions, and celebrations, the School can serve both to affirm the distinct identity of each individual, and to help students learn to appreciate the ways of others. We invite families to join us in promoting multicultural perspectives. We believe that excellence in education enables students to value themselves as individuals, at the same time preparing them to participate with confidence in a rich, complex, and changing society.

Lincoln School is a place where young women learn to listen, question, challenge, probe, and thereby gain knowledge and a measure of confidence that allows them to think for themselves about the workings of the world. When they graduate, we hope that Lincoln students will carry with them a strong sense of their own identity, a willingness to see the common threads that run through all our lives, a commitment to the wider community, and a high regard for the value and breadth of differences.


Our Quaker Heritage and Traditions


Lincoln came under the jurisdiction of the New England Yearly Meeting and Society of Friends in 1924 to provide a Quaker education for girls in Providence. Today, Lincoln School is accredited by the Friends Council on Education and incorporates the Quaker testimonies of Simplicity, Peace, Integrity, Community, Equality, Service, and Stewardship of the Earth into our lives on a daily basis.

Silent Meeting at Lincoln School provides a weekly forum for reflection on the Quaker values of respect for the individual and the inner light, which reflects the goodness in each one of us.  Silent Meeting begins when the first person sits down in the agreed-upon gathering space and continues while everyone is seated and beginning to, what Friends speak of as "centering down." Centering down is when our focus turns from external distractions to our quiet, centered place. During that time, students or faculty may choose to share thoughts and reflections with the community. At the end of our silence, a designated member of the meeting will shake hands with another person and each one present shakes hands with those sitting nearby.
At Lincoln, Silent Meeting takes on a different set of characteristics throughout our different programs and divisions.

  • In the early childhood program, a short silence is followed by the celebration of community and of individual worth.

  • In the Lower School, a longer silence is followed by a student led discussion on community values and issues.

  • In the Middle School, the concept of a "query," or essential question is introduced, and a more extended silence comes before a time to share announcements and sentiments about the community.

  • In the Upper School, the silent meeting is just that - silence that we hope secures a sense of inner peace and tranquility, providing an opportunity for everyone to learn how to listen inwardly and to perhaps share a piece of one’s inner-life. Announcements take place in another space making a distinction between the peaceful effect of Silent Meeting and the lively tone of Upper School announcements.

A variety of projects and committees are in place to continually reflect on our Quaker values. The Community and Spiritual Life Committee in the Upper School is involved with the Quaker Youth Leadership Conference.
The Religious and Spiritual Life Committee (made up of students, faculty, staff and three trustees) meets regularly to review our continuing work and to explore new opportunities for outreach and strategies for keeping our Quaker traditions and values vital and accessible within our community. The critical role of this committee remains to share and inform across the community and to the Board of Trustees about the spiritual work and activities that are taking place across the Lincoln community.

The Center for Peace, Equity and Justice through Service promotes the visionary leadership of individuals who embrace the values of Lincoln School and strive to construct new models for inclusion.
At Lincoln, one of our traditional songs, "Simple Gifts," speaks of the calming down into ourselves and discovering our humility, or - from our motto - our lowliness.  Lowliness is a quality of self-confidence, which allows one to encourage the strengths (and voices) of others. It is important that we maintain perspective and remain grateful for simple gifts.  We are indeed fortunate to be part of a community based upon Quaker values that expect each of us to act with social responsibility and compassion - that it is truly the simplest of gifts.
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The Basic Tenets of Lincoln School

Integrity of the Individual

Our philosophy begins with the basic assumption that each student operates from that which is good within her. Each student is provided an opportunity for independence appropriate to her age and developmental level. Hand in hand with independence go responsibility and loyalty to the basic tenets of the community. If a student's behavior violates these tenets, review of the situation by the Head of School in consultation with her advisor, her parents, Division Head, Dean of Students and Honor Council will include the consideration of separating her from the School.

A Lincoln Student is expected to:

  • be honest in her work, actions and speech.

  • respect the privacy of others' feelings and property.

  • extend courtesy and concern for every individual.

  • respect and protect the School's facilities and reputation.

  • attend with punctuality every class, appointment, or assigned commitment.

  • uphold and abide by the law, and not possess, use, or transfer any controlled chemical substances.

  • respect and abide by the rules of any school which she visits, and expect the same of her visitors.

Affirmation of Community Values

Our community comprises a wide spectrum of individuals, from all who attend and work at Lincoln School on a daily basis to those who are connected to the School in other ways. Quaker philosophy centers on the belief that each person operates from "that which is good within her." Each member of our community agrees to promote this philosophy by recognizing "that which is good" in others. Therefore, we are expected to treat all others with respect.

Lincoln School is a community of learners; Quaker values of honesty, respect, and simplicity form the foundation of our school community. Students agree to honor these values. They are accountable for their actions; they recognize that their choices affect both themselves and the well-being of the entire community.

Disrespect and Harassment

It is the policy of Lincoln School to provide an academic and extracurricular environment free from all forms of harassment. Harassment constitutes any unwelcome or uninvited violations (physical, verbal, written, electronic, or otherwise) of a person's right to safety and respect. Acts of harassment include, but are not limited to, the following behaviors:

  • Violence and assault - physical invasions of personal space that make another person feel unsafe or uncomfortable. Examples include, but are not limited to, threatening physical advances such as pushing, hitting, or scratching, and unwelcome sexual advances.

  • Intimidation - any action that involves forcing a member of the community to do something unwillingly, any derogatory or discriminatory remarks or gestures, any display of offensive or demeaning materials, any use of offensive slang terms or labels, and any offensive or threatening comments made through the Internet or electronic devices are all examples of intimidation.

  • Bullying - habitual verbal, written, or emotional cruelty toward another individual with the intention of causing harm, obtaining personal gain/pleasure, or intimidating others. This includes, but is not limited to name-calling, criticizing another's appearance, condition, or mannerisms, gossiping, racial slurs, etc.

  • Hazing - the initiation of students into a club, team, or organization on or off campus through violent, hostile, humiliating, intimidating, or demeaning acts. Hazing includes directing, aiding, or otherwise participating (actively or passively) in acts that intentionally threaten the physical or mental health of a student.


If a student feels harassed or if a parent or student witnesses an act of harassment she should inform or consult a trusted adult such as a teacher, administrator, or advisor.
Any of the acts described above will result in immediate disciplinary inquiry/action by the School Administration.
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Stealing

Unauthorized taking or "borrowing" of personal or school property will not be tolerated. Lincoln reserves the right to conduct searches of backpacks or lockers in the rare situation when strong suspicion of possession of stolen articles exists.

Possession of Threatening Objects

All weapons, tools, etc. (such as firearms or knives) that may potentially harm members of the community are strictly prohibited from school grounds.

School Identity

School Motto

Love, Loyalty, and Lowliness - the love of individuals, humanity, learning; loyalty to others, family, school, and country; lowliness, in the ancient sense of the word, a quality of self-confidence which allows one to encourage and to respect the strengths of others.

School Mascot

To celebrate the opening of the Boss-McLoughlin Gymnasium in 1986, the students selected a mascot, the Lynx. The mascot represents the linking of school to individual, and the agility and strength displayed by the School’s teams.

School Name

Lincoln School (not The Lincoln School) was named to honor John Larkin Lincoln, who was a professor of history at Brown University and an early advocate for equality in the education of girls and young women.  He was particularly admired for his high standards of education by the School's founder, Mrs. William Ames, mother of Daisy Dwight.
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Campuses and Facilities

Campuses

Lincoln School facilities are located on two separate campuses.

The Providence campus is at 301 Butler Avenue on the East Side of Providence, and is made up of Faxon Hall, Dorothy Gifford Science Wing, Paul and Ruth Levinger Dining Room, Francis Wheeler Gymnasium, Ebner, Elson, Hart Music Center, Murray Middle School, Lower School, the Little School, Boss-McLoughlin Gymnasium, and Dwight House.

The school’s outdoor athletic facilities located at Faxon Farm, 180 Danforth Street in Rehoboth, MA, feature the Murray Family Athletic Complex including a state-of-the-art artificial turf field, two natural turf fields and the Boss Family Tennis Center with six all-weather tennis courts.  The site is also home to the Carriage House and Terrace, historic farmhouse and barn.

Directions to Faxon Farm

Lincoln Store

Lincoln supports an online school store that supplies articles of clothing and accessories bearing the school name and official logos.  The clothing in this store are both for students and adults.  Please be advised that while items in the store bear Lincoln branding, all are not acceptable “in-uniform” colors and are therefore not appropriate for in-school wear.  

The link to the store is http://www.amerasport.com/LINCOLN-SCHOOL/departments/1409/

Business Office

The Business Office is located in the lower level of Faxon Hall. The office handles all questions regarding finances, billing, the treasuries of student activities and organizations, and insurance.

Libraries

The libraries are located in two locations: the Elwood E. Leonard Library located on the main floor of Faxon Hall and serving the needs of the Upper and Middle schools, and the Lower School Library located on the lower level of the Lower School. The libraries are open and staffed daily from 7:45 a.m. to at least 3:00 p.m. and often later. Students may use the library after school until the buildings close at 6:00 p.m.

The libraries are interconnected through an electronic catalog and circulation system. The catalog can be accessed off-site through the school's website under School Life> Upper School Library. The website also provides links to numerous electronic resources and databases for student research. All members of the Lincoln community are invited to use the libraries. Parents should apply at the desk for their own library accounts.

Dining Room

The Paul and Ruth Levinger Dining Room is located in Faxon Hall and serves students in all three divisions of the school. Our all-school lunch program is provided to all members of grades one through twelve and is included in our yearly tuition. The objective is to provide well-balanced, nutritious lunches and snacks, with enough variety to please the different palates of the students. The Dining Room is a social center which brings students and faculty of all divisions together. Every student who eats lunch in the Dining Room is required to clear her place, to clean up the table after eating, and to use the recycling containers provided. Breakfast and snacks are available to upper and middle school students for purchase.
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Health Services and Campus Safety

The Nurse is responsible for Health Office guidelines and for looking after the day-to-day details of the health and safety of both students and faculty, and oversees the medical aspects of the Physical Education Program. The Health Office is located on the lower level of the Murray Middle School.

Health Form

Each year every student must submit a health form which has been completed by his/her physician. The School realizes that it is at times difficult to arrange appointments, but regrettably, without a current health form, the School cannot allow students to be in attendance, nor to participate in any field trip or athletic activity. The immunization record portion of the health form is required by State Law, and it is therefore necessary that parents fill in this section completely and keep it up to date. If a child has a particular health concern, parents should call or visit the Nurse so that she can respond knowledgeably to the child's needs and inform Division Principals and faculty when appropriate.

Health Policy

Students may not carry medication on the school premises. Medication includes any over-the-counter medications, homeopathic treatments/preparations and/or prescription medication. Epi-Pens and inhalers are permitted on the student as a first-line emergency intervention. All medications must be checked in with the Nurse and kept in the Health Center where all medications are stored in a locked facility and managed by the Nurse. A physician's written order must accompany all prescribed medication and must be documented and kept in the Health Center and administered as ordered. A back-up "refill" of the student's Epi-Pen and/or inhaler/s is recommended in case of loss or damage. All duplicate prescriptions are stored in the Health Center.
In the case of a serious health issue or injury, a note from the doctor or permission for our nurse to speak with the doctor is required.

Illness

Parents will be notified if there is an outbreak of contagious illness at school. If a child contracts a contagious disease, parents should notify the Nurse as soon as possible. Parents are asked to report to the appropriate Division Director any illness which will keep a child at home.

Illness during School

If a child becomes ill during the school day, we will call the parents to request that they make arrangements for their child to be picked up in a timely manner. If we cannot reach the parents, we will call the emergency name provided. If a student who drives to school becomes ill, she will not be allowed to drive home or take public transportation without the permission of a parent.

Drugs, Illegal Substances and Alcohol

The use or possession of alcohol, illegal substances or drugs on campus, at school functions, or outside of Lincoln School is prohibited. All prescription medications must be registered at the Nurse’s office. Use or possession may result in immediate suspension or expulsion.

Lincoln is committed to helping students involved with drugs or alcohol and has a network of intervention and referral sources through the nurse and psychologist. Students are encouraged to seek assistance from these individuals.

Emergencies

In the event of an emergency, the supervising adult and/or Nurse will follow appropriate emergency procedures (described below), notify parents, and file a written report with the Head of School. It is essential for parents to keep us current with daytime telephone numbers and contact persons if parents are away from home.

Emergency Procedures           

In all emergencies, we will immediately try to reach parents. In extreme emergencies 911 will be called concurrently. If we cannot reach either parent, we will call the emergency contacts designated by the parents on the health form. In the event we cannot reach this person, we will contact the child's physician.

 

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Snow Days or Emergency Dismissal

If serious inclement weather or other unforeseen emergency requires the School to close, announcements will be aired on Channels 6, 10 and 12 television. The decision to close the School will be made by 5:00 a.m. in consultation with Moses Brown, Providence Country Day, Gordon, and Wheeler Schools. Please be careful not to confuse "the Lincoln School System" with "Lincoln School in Providence." Parents can also call the school’s main telephone number for a recorded message, or check www.lincolnschool.org for an online posting.  Lincoln also subscribes to the AlertNow messaging service whereby parents/guardians can receive telephone notices and/or emails announcing special conditions. Parents can submit daily and emergency telephone numbers and email addresses specifically for the AlertNow system on the Student Information form or by filling out the online form.
Information on emergency dismissal will be posted on the Lincoln School website and sent out through AlertNow.

Transportation           

Each family is responsible for transportation arrangements to and from the School. Private bus companies offer transportation from outlying areas. For specific information, please contact the Admission Office. Because so many of our students come from considerable distances and have to rely on private transport, we provide a supervised Extended Day Program in the Lower School. Lincoln is in a quiet, residential neighborhood where the impact of our traffic is significant. We request that all drivers be mindful of the safety of our students and be considerate of our neighbors. During drop-off and pick-up, please do not block the front circle or disrupt the flow of traffic. Cars parked in no parking areas will be ticketed.

Bicycles

Cyclists should be careful when turning into the back driveway or onto East Orchard Avenue from Butler Avenue. Cyclists must observe traffic regulations: stopping at signals, signaling for turns, riding on the right with traffic. They are strongly encouraged to wear helmets. Please be sure to securely lock bikes on bike racks during school hours.

Cars

All faculty, staff, and students with cars are required to register their cars at the Front Desk at the beginning of the school year.  East Orchard Avenue between Butler Avenue and Patterson Street (up to the school's front circle) is ONE WAY ONLY heading east in from Butler Avenue.
Click for further traffic information.

Parking

Parking on East Orchard Avenue between Butler Avenue is for the Lincoln School community only.
There is no parking in the front circle.
Student parking is very limited. Options include the north side of Oriole Avenue and residential streets north and south of the campus. Some streets ban parking between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m., however. Students may not park in the front circle at any time.
Since parking is limited on campus, everyone is urged to consider using public transportation, car pools, bicycling or walking to school as other options, where reasonable.
Lincoln reviews parking options on campus and in the neighborhood with facilities planners and the City of Providence on a regular basis.
Click for further traffic information.


Drop-Off/Pick-Up  
         

Upper and Middle Schools: Drivers of Middle and Upper School students are urged to drop off and pick up passengers within the front circle, or at the location of the designated crossing guard at the intersections of Butler Avenue and Blackstone Boulevard. This will help to alleviate traffic congestion on East Orchard Avenue before 8:00 a.m.
Click for further traffic information.
Lower School drivers are urged to observe the drop-off and pick up policies issued at the beginning of each school year.

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Development and Alumnae Relations

Lincoln is able to provide girls and young women with a highly-enriched educational experience delivered by a talented and dedicated faculty and exemplary facilities thanks to the generous support of our parents, alumnae, grandparents, foundations, and friends.  Every year, more than 1,000 contributors participate in supporting our students, faculty and program.

Gifts to the Annual Fund, donations for the School’s endowment, and special gifts for capital projects and special initiatives ensure that Lincoln can maintain its commitment to delivering the highest quality education for its students.  We are deeply grateful to all our supporters for their investment in Lincoln’s mission. Lincoln is a non-profit organization and receives no public funding. All gifts to Lincoln are tax deductible.

The Development and Alumnae Relations Department directs fundraising and alumnae relations in support of Lincoln's distinctive educational mission. Lincoln has more than 3,500 alumnae who lie and work in communities around the globe. The department works in partnership dedicated volunteers who serve on the Lincoln's Board of Trustees, the Alumnae Association Board, Light Up Lincoln Benefit Committee and the Annual Fund Committee. If you are interested in serving on one of these committees or volunteering your time and expertise, please contact Adrienne Morris, Director of Development and Alumnae Relations at amorris@lincolnschool.org or by phone at 401-331-9696 ext. 3118.

Ways to get involved:

Lincoln School Annual Fund Campaign:
Annual giving is the most important way Lincoln's friends and families can advance Lincoln's mission and programs.  More than 1,000 parents, alumnae, parents of alumnae, faculty, staff, grandparents, relatives and friends of Lincoln School currently donate to the Annual Fund, which generates 8.9% of Lincoln's net operating revenue. Thanks to the generosity of the Lincoln community, the Fund has experienced significant growth in the past five years.  Each and every gift to the fund makes a difference in the daily lives of Lincoln students.  Strong participation from parents and alumnae also helps Lincoln compete for grants from foundations and corporations and leverage support from other donors.  For more information about the Annual Fund, please click here.

Light Up Lincoln:
Light Up Lincoln is the school's annual benefit to support need-based scholarships.  The 2012-13 event will be held in April 2013.  This celebratory evening is a fun night out, giving guests the opportunity to enjoy mingling with parents, alumnae, faculty/staff, and friends of Lincoln.  The event features dinner, dancing, live and silent auctions, and a wine sale.  If you are interested in joining the Light Up Lincoln Planning Committee, please contact Joyce Botelho, Assistant Director of Development and Alumnae Relations.

Special Projects and Endowment:

Lincoln benefits from designated gifts and grants to support student financial aid; new academic initiatives; programs in athletics, music and art; capital improvements; and to build our endowment for student financial aid, faculty support, and program support. Current funding priorities include the renovation of Faxon Farm, student financial aid, faculty development funding, and support of new academic technology.  For more information about special initiatives, please click here.

Planned Giving:

Planned gifts such as bequests and charitable gift annuities are a vital investment in Lincoln's future, fostering our educational mission and commitment to excellence for years to come. For donors, they are attractive because, in addition to providing vital support to the School, they can result in significant tax savings for donors and their families.

Alumnae Relations:

The Alumnae Relations Program guided by the Alumnae Association ensures that Lincoln alumnae have a vital and meaningful connection to Lincoln, the leadership of the School, and Lincoln students. With more than 3,500 alumnae worldwide, graduates are a vital part of our School, serving in important leadership roles and promoting its educational legacy. Alumnae programs include alumnae networking events, regional events, Reunion Weekend (October 12-13, 2012), alumnae awards, legacy events, the Lincoln Magazine, the Lincoln School Alumnae Facebook page, Linkedin, and the Online Alumnae Community.

Staff and Contact Information

Please contact Adrienne Morris, Director of Development, for more information on how to get involved and support Lincoln School through these programs. We look forward to hearing from you.

Adrienne C. Morris, Director of Development and Alumnae Relations
Ext. 3118, amorris@lincolnschool.org

Joyce Botelho, Assistant Director of Development and Alumnae Relations
Ext. 3127, jbotelho@lincolnschool.org

Stephanie Calat DiPrete '89, Special Events and Parent Relations Manager
Ext. 3163, sdiprete@lincolnschool.org

Lauren Jordan, Communications and Prospect Development Manager
Ext. 3158, ljordan@lincolnschool.org

Naydine Gergora Rock '76, Development & Alumnae Relations Associate
Ext. 3126, nrock@lincolnschool.org
 

Parents Working With Schools and Schools Working with Parents

Revised and approved by the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) Board in 2004.
Parents and independent schools work together to create and sustain effective partnerships. The following principles of good practice describe the respective roles and responsibilities of both partners.


Parents Working with Schools

Parents recognize that effective partnerships are characterized by clearly defined responsibilities, a shared commitment to collaboration, open lines of communication, mutual respect, and a common vision of the goals to be reached.

In selecting an independent school, parents seek an optimal match for the needs of the student, their own expectations, and the philosophy and programs of the School.

Parents are familiar with and support the School's policies and procedures.
Parents provide a home environment that supports the development of positive learning attitudes and habits.

Parents involve themselves in the life of the School.

Parents seek and value the School's perspective on the student.

When concerns arise, parents seek information directly from the school, consulting with those best able to address the concerns.

Parents share with the School any religious, cultural, medical, or personal information that the School may need to serve the student best.


Schools Working with Parents

The School recognizes that effective partnerships are characterized by clearly defined responsibilities, a shared commitment to collaboration, open lines of communication, mutual respect, and a common vision of the goals to be reached.

The School clearly and fully presents its philosophy, program, and practices to parents during the admission process and encourages dialogue that clarifies parental expectations and aspirations for the student.

The School seeks and values the parents' perspective on the student.

Teachers and administrators are accessible to parents and model candid and open dialogue.

The School keeps parents well informed through systematic reports, conferences, publications, and informal conversations.

The School defines clearly how it involves parents when considering major decisions that affect the school community.

The School offers and supports a variety of parent education opportunities.

The School suggests effective ways for parents to support the educational process.

The School actively seeks the knowledge it needs to work effectively with a diverse parent body.

The NAIS Principles of Good Practice (PGP) for member schools define high standards and ethical behavior in key areas of school operations to guide schools in becoming the best education communities they can be.  Accordingly, membership in NAIS is contingent upon agreement to abide by "the spirit" of the PGPs. Principles are precepts grounded in an ethic and ethos of "doing the right thing."  Practices are common activities.

Lincoln School Parent Association Information

Lincoln School Parent Association (LSPA) Mission

The mission of the LSPA is to:

  • Foster effective and positive communication among Lincoln School, its administration, its faculty, and parent body;
  • Enrich the quality of the student experience at Lincoln by encouraging the involvement of the parents in the School’s programs and activities;
  • Support parents in preparing their children for satisfying and productive lives;
  • Support parent engagement and participation in the Annual Fund and other fundraising priorities that build a stronger and more vibrant community for learning at Lincoln;
  • Provide a vehicle for the expression and resolution of concerns shared by parents or any group of parents; and
  • Foster a community in which education and a lifelong love of learning are celebrated.

Organization and Membership of the LSPA

All members of the Lincoln School Parent Community are automatically members of the LSPA. The LSPA is lead by an Executive Committee (President, Vice President, Treasurer and Secretary) with leadership support from the Divisional Coordinators and the Class Representatives as well as the Chairs of the 2012-13 working committees - Admissions, Parent Fund, Light Up Lincoln, Book Festival, LYNX Club, BRAVO and Volunteer and Nominating.

Programs and Activities of the LSPA

The LSPA sponsors and organizes a series of meeting and events over the course of the School year to fulfill its mission and to enhance the School/Parent partnership. These events include quarterly LSPA meetings, divisional and class potlucks, coffees and other gatherings for informal and formal sharing, events in support of the performing and visuals arts programs (lead by BRAVO), and events in support of the Middle and Upper School teams (organized by the LYNX Club). In addition, LSPA has committees (see attached organizational chart) that support the admissions/recruitment of new students and families, the Annual Fund Campaign, the annual RI Festival of Children’s Books and Authors, and other events during the School year.

Division Coordinators

Division Coordinators for the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools work with the class representatives in support of division-specific events. They work in collaboration with the Divisional Directors - Maureen Devlin, Director, Lower School and Peter Brooks, Director of the Middle and Upper Schools. They will be responsible for organizing two Divisional coffees per year and other events. 2013-2014 Division Coordinators and Executive Committee

Class Representative

Class representatives act as the liaison between the parents, the LSPA and the school administration. They support the activities of the school and promote its goals and philosophy. Specific responsibilities include attending LSPA meetings 4 times a year as well as divisional meetings, calling for volunteers, assisting in organizing LSPA events and welcoming new families to the Lincoln community. Class reps are critical to relaying important news and information (reminder emails, informational meetings, volunteer opportunities, upcoming events) to the class(es) they support. 2013-2014 Class Reps

Volunteer Opportunities

Admissions Committee supports Lincoln School by focusing on promoting Lincoln within the greater RI/MA community to enhance admissions recruitment of new students.  Working in close collaboration with the Admissions Department, the committee will help recruit prospective families and internal Lincoln volunteers for Lincoln Admission Open House and regional admissions events throughout the year. In addition, members will asked to serve as mentors to a newly enrolled Lincoln family to help ensure a smooth transition into the Lincoln community

2013-2014 Chair, Alison Chu

Parent Fund Committee is an integral part of the Annual Fund Committee.  Working in close collaboration with the Development and Alumnae Relations Department and the Annual Fund Committee, this group leads the Parent fundraising for the Annual Fund to build parent participation and leadership in the Annual Fund.

2013-2014 Co-Chairs, TBD

Light Up Lincoln Committee plans, organizes, recruits volunteers, and promotes the Spring Benefit within the Lincoln parent community. This committee works closely with the Development and Alumnae Relations Department in executing this important community-wide special event.

 

RI Festival for Children’s Books and Authors Committee recruits parent volunteers to help organize and work at the annual Book Festival (October 13) and helps promote the Book Festival in the greater Providence and RI communities. 

 

Lynx Club is a parent-run booster club supporting Lincoln athletic teams in the Middle and Upper Schools. Its programs enhance school spirit and provide additional support for athletics. In addition to helping build awareness and attendance at all Lincoln School athletic games and matches, Lynx Club events include a used equipment sale in the Spring, and concession stands at Lincoln-hosted tournaments.

 

BRAVO supports the visual and performing arts at Lincoln School. BRAVO helps showcase the talent of Lincoln students in the visual, performing and literary arts and works to encourage community-wide appreciation of the arts. BRAVO organizes receptions in conjunction with each major performance at Lincoln, hangs the Visual Arts Showcase in the Spring, and works closely with the Visual and Performing Arts Department to support arts events at Lincoln.

 

Volunteer and Nominating Committee helps identify candidates to fill a variety of volunteer roles, including the LSPA officers, executive committee, class representatives, and committee chairs.

 

For more information on how you can get involved, contact Stephanie DiPrete, Special Events and Parent Relations Manager at 401.331.9696 x3163 or sdiprete@lincolnschool.org.  

Parents Away from Home

If parents are to be away, they must leave in writing with the Division Principal the name, address, and telephone number of the person who will be responsible for their child. We will also need to know exactly how and when they may be reached in case of emergency. Since we have found that many children, particularly younger ones, suffer some stress when parents are away, it is helpful if we know in advance about family travel plans so that we may be aware of special needs.

Parent-Hosted Parties and Social Gatherings

One of the most frequently discussed concerns of parents is how to host an appropriate social gathering for their daughter and friends. Here are the guidelines that the School follows for social gatherings:

  • Have at least two adult couples chaperone and be actively available.
  • Allow no one to return after leaving the party. Set an arrival time limit.
  • At no time serve or allow alcohol or other controlled substances to be used. Remember, the Rhode Island state legal drinking age is 21, and the host of a party can be held personally liable in cases of alcohol or controlled substance related accidents.
  • If a party is large, engage a member of the police to provide security and control outside.
  • Set a specific closing time and state it on the written invitation.
  • Always include your telephone number and address on the invitation.

If you receive a request to host a “School” party, please check with the Division Principal or Dean of Students first. Whenever the School can be of help, whether with a specific question or a general concern, please do not hesitate to call. The Lincoln School Parents’ Association is also a resource.

The Lincoln School and Parent Partnership

The Lincoln School Parent Partnership is a mutual commitment between students, parents, and the School. The expectations are as follows:

School

Parents

Fulfill the mission

Agree with and support the mission

Administer and uphold the basic tenets of the school

Follow the basic tenets of the school

Provide a safe, caring environment

Provide a quiet place for study

Be consistent in values and discipline

Support our values and discipline

Communicate with you about your child and school

Communicate with the school about your child and attend school meetings and functions

Uphold the school guidelines

Support and uphold school guidelines

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Uniform and Dress Code for Middle and Upper Schools

Lincoln School has a long cherished tradition of students wearing a uniform.  The jumper and kilt are worn with pride and signify our belief that simple and practical clothing worn by girls at Lincoln removes from the morning routine the “what should I wear?” dilemma.  The kilt, worn with approved shirts, shoes, sweaters, and sweatshirts, reinforces the Quaker tenets of simplicity and equity.

Students are required to be in uniform at morning meeting every day and students are expected to stay in uniform for the duration of the school day from 7:45 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. All faculty and staff will monitor the Student Dress Code.

Monday - Thursday

1. Collared Shirts/Turtlenecks- Students are required to wear collared shirts or turtlenecks (black, navy blue, or white) to school every day. T-shirts are not permitted.

2. Kilts/Pants- Students are required to wear either the Lincoln kilt or jumper (with shorts or spandex) to school everyday or khaki colored, cotton twill pants to school (only Monday through Thursday).

3.  Socks/Hosiery - Students may wear socks of any color. Tights must be black, navy blue, gray, or white.

4. Shoes- Students may wear sneakers or closed toe shoes with soles (any color). Boots (including Uggs) may be worn to school but must be removed by the start of morning meeting.

5. Sweaters/Jackets- Students may wear unadorned sweaters, cardigans, or jackets in black, navy blue, white, or gray.

6. Sweatshirts- Students may wear sweatshirts that only have a Lincoln logo.

7. Accessories-  Scarves of any color may be worn.  Hats and bandanas are not allowed (except for headscarves worn for religious purposes).

Friday

All students must come to school in the Lincoln kilt, a collared shirt or turtleneck, black, dark brown or navy shoes (flats- no heels, no sneakers, no fuzzy slippers/moccasins), and black, navy blue, gray, or white tights or ankle/knee-high socks. No mid-calf socks will be permitted. Tights and socks must be solid with no pattern or design.  Outerwear is in uniform on Friday but must be solid black, white, navy blue, or gray.  Sweatshirts are not in uniform on Friday.

Dress Code Violations

The dress code will be monitored by faculty and staff during morning meeting and throughout the day.  A student who is not in proper uniform by the end of morning meeting will be given the opportunity to change before her first period class. Failure to do so will result in a discussion with her advisor and/or the Dean of Students, and a phone call home to parents.

Students with three dress code violations will result in a meeting with the Dean of Students and possible after school detention.

August 2013

Physical Education Attire

All students participating in physical education class are expected to wear sneakers/athletic shoes.    PLEASE NOTE: ALL clothing should be marked with students’ names.

Upper School PE Attire
Participants will be expected to change into appropriate workout clothes such as shorts, t-shirts, spandex, sweatshirts and sweatpants. Lincoln logo attire is not required. Athletic sneakers are essential for most activities.

Middle School PE Attire

Middle School students will be issued a locker with a combination lock and will change into physical education clothes for class. They should wear a Lincoln T-shirt (a bookstore logo T-shirt, a shirt from a Lincoln event such as the book fair, field day, tournament or camp) or a plain T-shirt in a Lincoln uniform color (white, navy blue, black, dark green or gray); athletic length Lincoln logo shorts or plain colored shorts in Lincoln uniform colors; socks and sneakers/athletic shoes. Lincoln logo or plain uniform colored sweatpants and sweatshirts may be worn as well. All clothing should be marked with the students' name. Lincoln Store


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Upper School

Academic Policies

Coursework

Homework enables students to learn, to share what they have learned, and to learn from others. Therefore students are expected to hand in homework on time. Students should not expect to receive credit for work handed in late or for quizzes and tests not completed in a timely manner.

In order to succeed in classwork, students must cultivate time-management skills. A crucial aspect of time management is communication. Students must communicate with their teachers and advisor to let them know if they need help managing their time.
It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of homework assignments and in-class assessments. If a student is absent, she must ask each of her teachers about missed assignments and assessments on her first day back in school. In the case of extended, excused absences, students must make special arrangements with their teachers to receive assignments.

In the case of unexcused absences, students will NOT be given the opportunity to make up missed assignments or assessments.

We do not fax homework.

Diploma Requirements

The Board of Trustees confers the Lincoln School diploma on the recommendation of the Head of School and Upper School Faculty. The recommendation is based upon the evaluation of the student's successful fulfillment of the diploma requirements, completion of each year's work, and her support of the School’s tenets.

The year’s work is defined as five full-credit courses plus required enrichment and physical education courses, except in unusual cases approved by the Upper School Director. Listed below are requirements for a Lincoln School diploma.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

Lincoln does not send student GPAs to colleges unless required for particular programs. Please contact the College Counselor (Helen Bodell) ext. 3141 with questions.


Academic Requirements
 

The Board of Trustees confers the Lincoln School diploma on the recommendations of the Head of School and Upper School faculty. The recommendation is based upon the evaluation of the student’s successful fulfillment of the diploma requirements, completion of each year’s work, and her support of the School’s tenets.

The year’s work is defined as five full-credit courses plus required enrichment and physical education courses, except in unusual cases approved by the Upper School Principal.

Most students elect to take five academic courses each year for a total of twenty credits. A minimum of sixteen academic credits is required. The following is a list of the required courses and credits for a Lincoln School diploma.

Course Type

Minimum Requirements

English

Four full-year courses (one each year)

World Language

Completion of the third-level course in one language

History

• One World History course in Grade Nine

• US History in Grade Eleven

• One history elective 

Mathematics

Three full-year courses with a minimum mastery of Algebra 1, 2, 

and Geometry

Science

Three laboratory sciences from Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

Performing Arts

One year in a Performing Art

Visual Arts

Grade Nine Studio Art

Performing or Visual Arts

An additional year in either Visual Arts or Performing Arts

College Awareness

Grade Eleven 

Community Service

Required over the course of four years

Ethical Citizenship

Grade Ten 

Health

Grades Nine, Ten, and Eleven 

Transitions

Grade Nine

Public Speaking

To be taken either Grade Ten, Grade Eleven, or first semester Grade 12

Physical Education/Sports

Each year

Senior Service Project

Grade Twelve

Departmental requirements comprise sixteen required academic credits. A good secondary school education includes additional courses in areas of interest or talent to provide depth as well as breadth in the program of studies. Other courses may be selected from the Arts (Visual or Performing) or from an elective course in English, World Languages, History, Technology and Media, Mathematics, or Sciences. Final decision on course availability will be subject to course enrollment.


Grading System

All grades are to be given as letters, following the numerical equivalents given below.

A Work of consistently high caliber
Participation in class discussion outstanding in quality
Intellectual enthusiasm
Considerable initiative and originality in approach
Ability to apply the factual material learned, draw conclusions, make comparisons, and develop general concepts
B Good grasp of subject matter
Thoughtful applications of facts learned
Ability to express ideas with facility and fluency
Meaningful contribution to class discussions
C Adequate understanding and use of subject matter
Acceptable class participation and preparation
D Work slightly above minimum requirements. (This level of work at year's end gives little promise of marked success in any further study of the subject.)
F Work not meeting minimum standard


The above presupposes that assigned work is completed punctually, is neat, and in proper form.

 

Grading Scale

A+ 97-100   C+ 77-79
A 93-96   C 73-76
A- 90-92   C- 70-72
B+ 87-89   D+ 67-69
B 83-86   D 60-66
B- 80-82   F 0-59


Add/Drop Policy

Upper School Add/Drop Dates - 2013-2014

Trimester I - October 3, 2012
All classes dropped before the drop date will be removed from the student's transcript. All classes dropped after the drop date will remain on the transcript and receive a grade of WD (withdrawal).

Procedure for Adding or Dropping an Upper School Class

A Schedule Change Request Form (available in the Upper School Office) must be completed and signed by the student, (space needed) advisor, and department chair and returned to the Upper School office before the designated add/drop date. Upon approval, the student will receive an updated schedule. All students must remain in their originally scheduled classes until they receive their new schedule as confirmation that the schedule change has been approved.

Academic Standards

Academic Review

If a student earns a grade of 'C-' or below in two or more courses at mid-semester or at the end of a semester, she will be considered on Academic Review.
A student on "Academic Review" and her parents will meet with the Upper School Director and her advisor to determine an appropriate course of action, which may include supervised study and extra help sessions with her teachers. If a student is placed on Academic Review for three or more quarters, her re-enrollment contract may be reviewed and may be held by the Upper School Director and the Head of School.

Conduct in Testing Environments

The purpose of an exam, test, quiz, or other assessment is to evaluate a student's command of a topic. Students need a proper working environment to demonstrate their knowledge. Students must respect their peers during assessments by arriving on time and avoiding any distracting behavior.
Inappropriate conduct during assessments is a serious breach of  academic standards, and will result in disciplinary action, and may be referred to the Honor Council. If such behavior compromises an AP exam,  the student will be dismissed from the exam immediately,  and will not be allowed to take additional AP exams until the student and her parents meet with the Upper School Director.

Incomplete Course Work

An incomplete grade 'I' will be recorded only when a student is unable to complete course work as a result of serious illness, accident, or family emergency. If missing work is completed within six weeks into the semester/quarter immediately following (or within the time designated by the teacher, not to exceed six weeks), the teacher will issue a final letter grade replacing the temporary 'I' designation. If the work is not submitted by the appropriate deadline, the student will receive an 'F' for the missing work, and the final grade will then be averaged and recorded. The six-week time limit may be extended only through written consent of the Upper School Director in response to a written request initiated by the student/parent and co-signed by her academic advisor.

Integrity: A Statement of Academic Honesty

Honesty is at the heart of Lincoln's mission as an academic community and Quaker school. Dishonesty undermines both the community and the students' own learning. Therefore all students are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic honesty. Presenting work that is not one’s own is plagiarism.  Giving one’s work to another student is cheating. In every piece of academic work, from homework assignments to exams, students are expected to acknowledge their sources. Students are expected to consult The Modern Language Association Handbook for clarification, and should always consult with a teacher when they have questions.

Procedure and Consequences

If a faculty member believes that a student has plagiarized or cheated, the faculty member will speak with the Upper School Director and the Dean of Students, who will discuss the issue with the faculty member, the appropriate department head, and the student and her advisor.  The family will be contacted by the school. If it is determined that a student presented work that was not her own, there will be a disciplinary response, that may include an appearance before the Honor Council. The student will receive a zero for that work and the incident will be recorded on her record. A second incident of academic dishonesty may result in suspension or dismissal.

Academic Reporting

Conferences and Reports

Upper School students receive letter grades at the end of each quarter and comments two times a year.
Students earning a grade of 'C-' or below at any grading period will receive a comment report. Evaluation of work is based on preparation for class, participation in class, tests, papers, projects, and other assignments. Parent conferences with teachers and advisors are held in the fall. Parent conferences for students in all grades may be held in addition to these regularly scheduled meetings at the request of either the parents or the school.

Testing

Services for Students with Disabilities: College Board Testing Information

Eligibility for Test Accommodations

A student with a documented disability may be eligible for accommodations on College Board tests.
An SSD Student Eligibility Form must be submitted for each student requesting accommodations. To be eligible, the student must:

  1. Have a disability that necessitates testing accommodations.
  2. Have documentation on file at school that supports the need for requested accommodations and  meets the Guidelines for Documentation, and
  3. Receive and utilize the requested accommodations, due to the disability, for school-based tests.


If all of these requirements are not met, a student may appeal the requirements.

Note:

  • Only one SSD Student Eligibility Form needs to be completed for each student. It will cover all noted College Board testing programs for as long as the student remains in his/her school and the school verifies annually that the eligibility requirements and documentation guidelines continue to be met.
  • Scores will not be reported if the accommodations are not approved by the College Board SSD prior to the test administration.
  • Some psychiatric disabilities may require annual reapplication for eligibility.


Guidelines for Documentation
The presence of an IEP, 504 Plan, other formal written educational plan, or professional evaluation does not guarantee that a student is eligible for testing accommodations. Documentation to support the need for testing accommodations must:

  1. State the specific disability, as diagnosed;
  2. Be current (in most cases, the testing and evaluation should be completed within three years of the request for accommodations). For psychiatric disabilities, the evaluation must be within 12 months of the request for accommodations;
  3. Provide relevant educational, developmental, and medical history;
  4. Describe the comprehensive testing and techniques used to arrive at the diagnosis (including evaluation date(s) and test results with subtest scores from measures of cognitive ability, academic achievement, and information processing). For a list of acceptable tests, please visit www.collegeboard.com/ssd/ and select Documentation;
  5. Describe the functional limitations supported by the test results;
  6. Describe the specific accommodations requested, including the amount of extended time required if applicable. State why the disability qualifies the student for such accommodations on standardized tests; and
  7. Establish the professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license or certification and area of specialization.

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Attendance

Overview

A student's responsibilities to the community include full attendance, and therefore each student is expected to attend school while it is in session, from 7:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  Class meeting begins at 7:45 a.m. and it is imperative that students be on time each morning to receive important announcements, take part in planning class activities, and have attendance taken.

Students with absences of more than 10% (approximately 17) of school days will come under review by the Dean of Students and the Upper School Director.  A student risks losing credit for missed courses.

Lateness to School

A. Students are expected to arrive at school by 7:45 a.m. for morning meeting/advisory.

B. Students who arrive to morning meeting after roll has been called will be marked as late by their advisors (Middle School) or their class coordinators (Upper School).

C. If a student arrives to school late three times, she, her advisor, and her parents will receive an email informing her of the importance of coming to school on time.

D. Any further late arrivals will result in a Tuesday afternoon detention (for Upper School students) or a loss of break privileges (for Middle School students) and the student’s parents will be called in for a meeting with the Dean of Students.

E. Chronic lateness could result in further disciplinary action.

F. Parents are expected to contact the school by 9:00 a.m. to excuse a student who is late to school. Calls received after 9:00 will be considered unexcused with rare exceptions- only major traffic delays, major vehicular problems or serious extenuating circumstances will excuse lateness.

Class Tardiness

Students' responsibilities to the learning community include prompt attendance in all classes and events. In the event that a student is held in class after the beginning of the next class period, she is  required to ask for a note from the teacher explaining the tardiness.

Consequences:           
If a student is late to any class more than two times, her teacher will notify her advisor and the Dean of Students.

Absence from School

A. Parents are expected to contact the school by 9:00 am to communicate a student’s absence. Calls received after 9:00 will be considered unexcused with rare exceptions.

B. When a student has an unexcused absence, the Dean of Students will contact the parents of that student to discuss the absence.

C. Repeated unexcused absences will result in a parent/student meeting with the Dean of Students.

D. Students must be in school by 10:00 a.m. in order to participate in afternoon programs that day, including sports, performing arts, and special events.

Appointments

Appointments outside of school during the school day are strongly discouraged. If for some reason an appointment must be scheduled during the day, parents must send an explanatory note, email, or phone call to the receptionist at least 24 hours in advance.

Excused Absences

If a student is absent because of illness or other unexpected circumstances, her family should contact the school between 7:30 and 9:00 a.m. to report the absence. After first period, the school will call the home of any student from whom no word has been received. An absence will be considered unexcused if a student's family does not contact the school or if we cannot contact the family.

If a student knows in advance that she will be missing school for any reason, she must bring a note from her parents explaining the absence and have it signed by her teachers, advisor and dean at least 24 hours before the absence.  The note should then be turned in to the receptionist.

Early Dismissal

At the discretion of the school, a student may be excused for a medical reason or a family emergency.

  • Her parents must send a written note to the Upper School Office 24 hours prior to the early dismissal, explaining the reason and stating the specific departure and return times.
  • She must ask each of her teachers whose classes she will miss to sign this note.
  • The student must then sign out at the front desk.

Students will not be dismissed early to retrieve items left at home such as homework or athletic equipment. 

Early Dismissal Due to Illness during School

The Nurse tends to the medical needs of our entire student body. If a student becomes ill during the day, she should:

  • report to class (if she has one) BEFORE going to the Health Center.
  • report to the Nurse; or, if the Nurse is unavailable, to the Upper School Office.


If a student needs to miss an afterschool activity (sports, drama) for medical reasons, she should contact the teacher or coach and the Dean of Students.

Consequences:
If a student leaves school for medical reasons without following the proper procedures, she will receive an infraction and may be required to appear before the Honor Council.

Extended Absence

If a student develops a pattern of absences from school or classes during a semester, she and her parents may be asked to meet with the Upper School Director and the Dean of Students.

Participation in Extra-Curricular Activities

If a student is not in school by 10:00 a.m., she may not participate in any extracurricular, athletic, or school-sponsored activity that day.

College Visits

We strongly encourage seniors to plan college visits during summer of junior year, spring break, holiday break in December, and over long weekends. However, seniors will be allowed three excused college visit days during the academic year. These visits must be cleared through the College Counseling Office. Students must get a College Visit Form signed by each of their teachers, their advisor and their dean. This form must be returned to the College Counseling Office at least 3 days in advance.

Unexcused Absences

In the case of unexcused absences, a student will NOT be given the opportunity to make up missed assignments or assessments.

Family Vacations

The school encourages family vacations and provides time for them during the academic year. Please note: The school will not excuse students for family vacations or other similar occasions that disregard the school calendar. Faculty will not make assignment accommodations for vacations that do not coincide with the school calendar. Please plan accordingly.

Missed Class

If a student intentionally misses a class, she will receive a detention and may be required to appear before Honor Council.

Missing School

If a student skips school, she will be required to appear before Honor Council.

Leaving Campus

Students must remain on campus at all times between 7:45 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., unless senior or junior privileges have been granted.

The main campus boundaries are Butler Avenue, Oriole Avenue, Patterson Avenue. The ravine is out-of-bounds.

If a student needs to leave campus for any reason, she must check with the Upper School Office.
Students may not go to their cars during school hours without permission from the Upper School Office.

Consequences:
If a student leaves campus without permission, she will be required to meet with the Dean of Students and may appear before the Honor Council.

Off-Campus Privileges

Seniors

Senior privileges (which allow seniors to leave campus during the school day) are not a right, but a privilege. Seniors can earn these privileges during the senior year by meeting the following criteria:

  • Being in good academic standing
  • Serving as a positive role model to underclass girls in the community
  • Respecting the larger community with conduct appropriate to a representative of Lincoln School
  • Attending all classes and school events promptly.


Senior privileges are granted at the discretion of the faculty, Dean of Students and the Upper School Director. Eligibility will be reviewed and awarded or rescinded as conditions arise. Students will be eligible for senior privileges at the beginning of November. Privileges will not exceed more than two free periods during the course of a day.

-  Seniors must be present for homeroom.
-  Seniors who are granted senior privileges have sign-out privileges after first period. (If a senior is not present during the first period in the morning, privileges will be rescinded for the day.)
-  Seniors must be present on campus during Clubs and Assembly periods.
-  During the day, students may use an automobile only with her family's approval.

If a student violates a community guideline, she will lose senior privileges for a period of time that will be determined by the Dean of Students, the Honor Council, or the Director of the Upper School.
Seniors who leave campus without permission will lose their privileges and must meet with the Dean of Students and may appear before the Honor Council.

Juniors

Juniors will be considered for off-campus privileges beginning May 1. A letter from the class requesting off-campus privileges should be submitted to the Upper School Director before May 1.
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Behavior in the Community

Cell Phones

Cell phones, PDA and hand-held computers have become tools that many parents, students and educators use regularly in their daily life. There are many benefits to using these tools appropriately and responsibly. Our goal is to provide the opportunity to use these tools while upholding our commitment to providing an ideal environment for learning and fostering community.

Because we acknowledge and celebrate the developmental differences between Middle and Upper school girls, we have different guidelines for the different divisions.

Upper school students are expected to use their cell phones in a way that does not compromise their ability or the ability of those around them, to learn and to be present. Phones should be off during any class, assembly or gathering. Students may use their phone in between classes as long as their use does not compromise the environment for others. Using the phone inappropriately will result in confiscation of the phone for the remainder of the school day and the student will be required to meet with the Dean of Students.

Eating and Drinking

Students must eat only in the designated dining area. Students may bring food to a classroom only with approval of their teacher. There is no food or drink (except water) permitted in the Hart Music Center/auditorium.

Internet and Mobile Device Use

Students are encouraged and often required to use the Internet for study and research. Certain sites are restricted from use in the school building. The Acceptable Use Policy must be signed by students before the student has permission to use the Internet.

Internet use is regularly monitored for content and violations of this policy.

Members of the Lincoln community are asked to respect the honor, dignity, and privacy and intellectual property of others at all times. They may not publish: a) identifiable names of other students or community members, b) any personal information about other students or community members, or c) any proprietary school information, including photos of the school on any social media (including, but not limited to texting, tweeting, blogs, YouTube, Facebook, etc.) without first obtaining the written permission of the school and all those involved.

Consequences:
Students who use chat rooms and websites for inappropriate communication or enter material which reflects poorly on the image of the school community will be required to meet with the Dean of Students, and may appear before the Honor Council.

Messages

Students are responsible for checking their mailbox daily and their email several times a day to receive messages from students, teachers, or administrative offices. The privacy of mail placed in mailboxes must be respected.

All school and class messages may be placed on the class bulletin boards in the lounge or included in class conference on the FirstClass email system. Students can access email in the Computer Lab or on handheld PDAs at the appropriate times.

Parking

As good members of this community, we must respect our neighbors, particularly with the use and parking of cars.

  • Students may NOT park in the Front Circle at any time.
  • Students may NOT park on the Patterson Street side of The Little School.
  • Student cars must be registered at the front desk.
  • Students must observe the local speed limit and must drive responsibly in the neighborhood.


Consequences:
A student parked illegally may be ticketed by the Providence Police.

Students observed driving recklessly will be reported to the Upper School Office and will meet with the Upper School Director.

Personal Belongings

Students should place all books and belongings in their locked locker. They are strongly encouraged to leave items of value at home.

Personal Safety

Students are expected to inform an adult member of the faculty, staff, or administration if they believe that their safety or the safety of another student is in question or at risk. If a student seeks help for herself or someone else, confidentiality will be maintained.

Public Spaces

All of the rooms and common areas at Lincoln School are shared spaces. It is each individual's responsibility to use these areas respectfully. Therefore, students are expected to:

  • pick up after themselves when they leave any room or common area;
  • be mindful of the volume of their voices;
  • eat ONLY in the designated dining area;
  • not leave their personal belongings in the lounge. Lockers are provided to store student books and valuables.

Student Lounges:
The student lounges are public spaces.  Students must be conscious of the people who pass through that space every day (students and faculty from all divisions, prospective students and families, visitors to the school).  Many students use the lounge area as a quiet space for studying. Music may be played only with headphones and all conversations should be done quietly.  The lounges must not be used for sleeping or viewing movies.

Consequences:
If a student use a public space disrespectfully, she will lose the privilege to use that public space for a period of time to be determined by the Dean of Students.

Smoking

Smoking in public buildings and schools and within 25 feet of the buildings is against state law. It is also illegal for students under the age of 18 years old to purchase, possess, or smoke tobacco products.

Uniform

Students are required to come to school in uniform daily.Uniform and Dress Code

Disciplinary Procedures

Infraction

An infraction is given to a student who violates a school rule or tenet. The infraction form is sent to the student, advisor, and Dean of Students. It is placed in the student’s record along with any consequences and fulfillment of such consequences. The student must read and respond to the infraction within 24 hours after it is issued.

Disciplinary Actions

Disciplinary actions fall into four categories:

  1. Most disciplinary situations will be handled by a faculty or staff member when and where they occur. If the disciplinary situation does not improve, the student’s advisor will be consulted.
  2. Many types of minor offenses will be referred to the Dean of Students who will determine an appropriate course of action.
  3. Major offenses will be referred to the Honor Council. On the day of an Honor Council hearing, a student must be at school for the academic day and may not participate in any extra-curricular or school sponsored activities or events.
  4. Suspension and/or expulsion of a student will be determined by the Upper School Director in consultation with the Head of School.

Suspension*

  1. In-school suspension:  an in-school suspension requires the student to be in school at 7:45 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., but she will not attend her classes.  The student will be monitored by a member of the faculty or staff.  The suspended student may complete missed class work and homework;  all work handed in, however, including tests, quizzes, and projects, will receive a late penalty.  The student may not participate in any extracurricular activities for the duration of the suspension.  It is not the teachers' responsibility to reteach any missed material.
  2. Out-of-school suspension:  an out-of-school suspension has the same academic and extracurricular consequences as an in-school suspension.  The student, however, will not be present in school and may not come to campus during the suspension.


*
It is the Honor Council's discretion to recommend whether an in-school or out-of-school is warranted.  The severity of the case will determine the duration of the suspension.

Detention

If a student does not adhere to the rules of the community, she may be assigned a detention. Detentions take place after school from 3:15 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. and are designed to encourage students to spend time considering the impact of their actions. Notification of detentions will be emailed to students. If a student does not report to the Dean of Students within 24 hours to schedule her detention, she will face further action.

If a student receives three (3) detentions for any reason during the trimester, she will be required to appear before the Honor Council.

The Honor Council

The goal of the Honor Council is to uphold the values of the community as set forth in the Handbook.

In addition to the Student Council President, Honor Council President, the Dean of Students, and 4 or 5 faculty members, there are two student representatives from each grade (appointed by their classmates).

The Honor Council holds a hearing when a student commits a major offense. Arriving at a recommendation by consensus, the Council provides a consequence, which the Dean of Students reports to the Upper School Director. The Upper School Director reviews the recommendation and advises the student and parents of the action being taken.

Consequences of Honor Council recommendations will be posted on the Upper School Community bulletin board.

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Physical Education

Participation

All students must take part in physical education class, a Lincoln sport, or an Independent Athletic Program to receive physical education credit on their transcript. Students participating on a Lincoln School after school athletic team or the Independent Athletic Program are exempt from physical education classes. At the end of each sports season, if a student is not participating in a sport the following season, she must sign up for physical education. Fall P.E. sign ups are available here.

Physical Education Class Times and Activities

Physical education classes are held after school Monday through Thursday from 3-4pm. Students will choose two days a week to attend class for that trimester. The students participate in a Personal Conditioning and Wellness Program in the Fitness Center consisting of resistance training and cardio training taught by certified strength and conditioning specialists from Performance Physical Therapy of RI. Throughout the year a variety of instructors will also offer classes in Zumba, Pilates, yoga, kickboxing and recreational games in the adjacent gymnasium. Students who participate in the winter musical will receive P.E. credit for participating in the dance choreography during rehearsal time after school.

If an Upper School student has extenuating transportation circumstances which make it impossible for her to stay after school for the required two classes a week for Physical Education, she may be considered for a special exemption from the class. Each student’s situation will be considered on an individual basis. This waiver is designed only for the student who is experiencing unusual transportation difficulties.

After School Exemption Form PDF

P.E. Attire

Participants will be expected to change into appropriate workout clothes such as shorts, t-shirts, spandex, sweatshirts and sweatpants. Lincoln logo attire is not required. Athletic sneakers are essential for most activities.

Attendance

If a student has been ill or has a medical problem but is in school and wishes to be excused from her physical education class, she must present a note to the P.E. department from a parent, doctor, or the school nurse. If her name is not on the absence list and she does not come to class, it is considered an unexcused absence. Long-term medical excuses should be written by the doctor and submitted to the school nurse at the beginning of the trimester.

Independent Athletic Program

Upper School students who participate in an after school competitive or performance based sport not offered at Lincoln School, may apply to use the Independent Athletic Program, which allows them to waive the physical education class requirement. To take part in this program, a proposal form must be filled out by both a coach/instructor and a parent/guardian and submitted to the Physical Education department head for approval. The student must be in training a minimum of eight hours a week and be supervised by a coach who submits a written end-of-season report. Each proposal is considered on an individual basis. These students are typically dancers, equestrians, figure skaters, and organized club team participants. Students who wish to do a personal fitness workout for an Independent Athletic Program will be encouraged to participate in our new after school opportunities with the Performance Physical Therapy of Rhode Island staff two days a week.

Independent Athletic Program PDF

Upper School Athletic Handbook

Library Policy

Hours

The Leonard Library is open and staffed from 7:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. daily and by appointment after school. Students may use the library after school until Faxon Hall closes at 6:00 p.m.

Circulation Policies

Library materials generally circulate for three weeks. A student will receive two overdue notices before parents are billed for unreturned materials. There are no late fines but unreturned books are billed at $25. A higher charge will be made for the replacement of more expensive materials. A $5 fee will be charged for books returned after billing.

Library Behavior

General quiet is expected in the library at all times. No food or drink is allowed in the library. A student's library privileges may be suspended if they are abused.

Organizations

Student Government

The Student Council, class presidents, and student leaders are the elected members of the student body responsible for providing leadership in all realms of school life.

Organizations and Clubs

Lincoln School is a place for learning, not only from texts and teachers, but also from each other. Working toward a group goal and learning how to enjoy each other's company are valuable components of a Lincoln education. There are numerous activities available to students, and students participate on a variety of commitment levels. Extra-curricular activities include interscholastic athletics, performing arts, political activities, publications, dances and other social gatherings, service work, and student government.

At times, a student will express an interest which may not be formalized as a student club or activity within the school. Whenever there is enough interest, the school is happy to help students organize an activity. Each student's advisor will be happy to help her develop her idea.


Middle School

Cell Phones

Cell Phones At Lincoln School

Communication technology, specifically cell telephones, has become an integral part of the daily lives of students, parents and teachers alike. Lincoln School fully understands and embraces the benefits that come from this technology and permits the use of such technology within certain parameters. The goal of the Lincoln School policy on cellular phones is to allow students to use their cell phones in a responsible and appropriate way that does not interfere with our commitment to foster an environment for learning and community. Because we acknowledge and celebrate the developmental differences between middle and upper school students, we have different guidelines for the different divisions.

Middle School Cell Phone Policy

1. MS students may have cell phones with them at school, but the sound and vibration must be turned off. Cell phones must reside in a locker or a school bag, not in hand.

2. MS students are allowed to use cell phones on campus anytime before 7:45 a.m. and after 3:00 p.m. MS students may use cell phones during the school day ONLY during the following times: Break (9:40 a.m. - 10:03 a.m.) and Lunch (12:39 p.m. – 1:17 p.m.). During break, cell phones may only be used in the MS Meeting Room. During lunch, cell phones may only be used in the MS Meeting Room or, weather permitting, outside.

Cell phones are to be used for calling or texting home, never for taking photos or for social media purposes (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.).

3. Students participating in after-school events/practices may use their cell phones with permission.

4. Each teacher has the right to allow the use of cell phones during instructional time for instructional, assessment, or testing purposes (i.e., the calculator function).

5. Any phone communication during the instructional day, except during break or lunch, will take place on school telephones with permission from office personnel with the exception of emergency situations as deemed by the Middle School Head. Parents should continue to call the school for any emergency situation.

6. Students are not permitted to bring cell phones into a classroom where standardized testing is taking place.

Any violations of the above policy will result in the following:

A student will be warned and the cell phone may be confiscated by the advisor or the Dean of Students for the remainder of that school day. Continued improper use of a cell phone will result in a conversation with the student’s advisor, the Dean of Students, and the student’s parents. The student may lose her privilege to have a cell phone at school for a period of time as determined by the parent and the school.

Possession of a cell phone by a student is a privilege, which may be forfeited by any student not abiding by the terms of this policy. Students shall be personally and solely responsible for the security of their cell phones. Lincoln School does not assume any responsibility for theft, loss, or damage of a cell phone, or unauthorized calls made on a cell phone.

August 2013

 

Internet Use

Students are encouraged and often required to use the internet for study and research. Certain sites are restricted from use in the school building. The Acceptable Use Policy must be signed by students before she has permission to use the internet.

Internet use is regularly monitored for content and violations of this policy.
Members of the Lincoln community are asked to respect the honor, dignity, and privacy, and intellectual property of others and the school at all times. They may not publish: a) identifiable names of other students or community members, b) any personal information about other students or community members, or c) any proprietary school information, including photos of the school on any social media (including, but not limited t blogs, YouTube, texting, tweeting Facebook, etc.) without first obtaining the written permission of the school and all those involved.

Messages

Students are responsible for checking their email at least once per day.  Many messages received during the day will be written on the whiteboard outside Mr. Brooks’ office. It is the responsibility of students to check this board on a daily basis for school information/messages

Personal Belongings

Students should place all books and belongings in their locker. They are strongly encouraged to leave items of value at home.

Public Spaces

All of the rooms and common areas at Lincoln School are shared spaces. It is each individual's responsibility to use these areas respectfully. Therefore, students are expected to:

  • pick up after themselves when they leave any room or common area;
  • be mindful of the volume of their voices;
  • eat ONLY in the designated dining area;
  • not leave their personal belongings in the lounge. Lockers are provided to store student books and valuables.

Middle School Meeting Room
The Middle School Meeting Room is a public space.  Students must be conscious of the people who pass through the meeting room every day (students and faculty from all divisions, prospective students and families, visitors to the school).  

Uniform

Students are required to adhere to the uniform policy.  Uniform and Dress Code

Advisors

Each student is assigned a teacher in the Middle School to be their advisor. Advisors review grades and academic work with their advisees and help with any problem, whether it be trouble with a course, a teacher, or a classmate. If a student or her parents need teacher assistance for any reason, the advisor is the person to be contacted. Group advisor meetings are scheduled regularly and if needed, at anytime, one-on-one. Students check in with their advisor every morning.

Dismissal/After School Program

If a student is not involved in the after school program and leaves campus at 3:00 p.m. she is not permitted to return to campus. After school study hall is available to all students, Monday through Friday from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Lincoln School closes at 6:00 p.m. and all students must be picked up no later than 6:00 p.m. A full program of sports and performing arts is also available.

Attendance

Overview

A student's responsibilities to the community include full attendance, and therefore each student is expected to attend school while it is in session, from 7:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  Class meeting begins at 7:45 a.m. and it is imperative that students be on time each morning to receive important announcements, take part in planning class activities, and have attendance taken.

Lateness to School

A. Students are expected to arrive at school by 7:45 a.m. for morning meeting/advisory.

B. Students who arrive to morning meeting after roll has been called will be marked as late by their advisors (Middle School) or their class coordinators (Upper School).

C. If a student arrives to school late three times, she, her advisor, and her parents will receive an email informing her of the importance of coming to school on time.

D. Any further late arrivals will result in a Tuesday afternoon detention (for Upper School students) or a loss of break privileges (for Middle School students) and the student’s parents will be called in for a meeting with the Dean of Students.

E. Chronic lateness could result in further disciplinary action.

F. Parents are expected to contact the school by 9:00 a.m. to excuse a student who is late to school. Calls received after 9:00 will be considered unexcused with rare exceptions- only major traffic delays, major vehicular problems or serious extenuating circumstances will excuse lateness.

Absence from School

A. Parents are expected to contact the school by 9:00 am to communicate a student’s absence. Calls received after 9:00 will be considered unexcused with rare exceptions.

B. When a student has an unexcused absence, the Dean of Students will contact the parents of that student to discuss the absence.

C. Repeated unexcused absences will result in a parent/student meeting with the Dean of Students.

D. Students must be in school by 10:00 a.m. in order to participate in afternoon programs that day, including sports, performing arts, and special events.

Conferences, Reports, and Grades

Students receive comments and letter grades at the end of each trimester  Evaluation of work is based on class preparation, participation and assessments. Parent conferences are held in the fall and in early March, students are encouraged to attend. On these conference days, there are no classes for students in Middle School. Parent conferences for students in all grades may be held in addition to these regularly scheduled meetings at the request of either the parents or the School.

Discipline

Middle School students are expected to understand and uphold the Basic Tenets of Lincoln School. Disciplinary actions may be taken for students who consistently fail to observe the community rules. Parents will be notified of any disciplinary action.

Homework

The faculty considers homework to be an integral part of the curriculum in every class. Homework is a way for students to extend what has been taught and to prepare them for the next sequential part of the course. Homework teaches thinking skills and independence in learning and must be completed in a required time. The average working time varies from student to student, class to class, and differs on certain days according to our rotating schedule. As a general time frame:

  • Grade 6 - up to 20 minutes per subject
  • Grade 7 - up to 30 minutes per subject
  • Grade 8 - up to 40 minutes per subject

The following rules are in place to help monitor homework.

  • Homework that is due must be handed in at the beginning of each class.
  • Homework is an integral part of the grade in every class. It is expected to be completed on the assigned day.
  • Individual teachers will establish specific guidelines regarding homework in their classes.
  • If a student is absent, homework will be posted on faculty websites. If the student is too ill to do the homework over a period of days, teachers will be notified and will arrange to help the student when she returns to school; otherwise, homework is due the day the student returns to school.

Sports

Middle School Athletic Handbook

Trips

As part of our leadership program, there are a number of trips which the faculty consider to be an integral part of the curriculum. The goals of these trips are both social and academic. Parents receive detailed information prior to each trip. Field trips are held throughout the year as well. The beginning of the year leadership trip is mandatory for all students.

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Lower School

Arrival and Dismissal

Arrival
All students should be arriving at their classroom at 7:55 a.m. We ask that students be dropped off between 7:30 a.m. and 7:50 a.m. in the front circle. Parents wishing to walk in with their child(ren) should park legally. Child care is provided from 7:30 a.m - 7:55 a.m in the Lower School Library.
Late Arrival
A student who arrives late must report both to the Lower School Office and to her teacher.
Dismissal
Formal instruction ends at 2:45 p.m. Children are dismissed between 2:50 and 3:00 p.m. in the pick-up area in front of Lower School. In case of emergency which prevents a parent's prompt arrival, parents should telephone the Lower School Office. The half-day Early Childhood morning session ends at 12:30 a.m. Any changes in a child's dismissal plan should be communicated to the school in writing.

Attendance

Absences because of illness or family emergency are excused. Parents should telephone the Lower School Office in the morning.

Cell Phones

While cell phones provide a way for parents to ensure contact with their children when the children are not on campus, Lower School students are not permitted to use them (for texting, photographing & video-taping, playing games, making calls) while on campus.  Students who carry cell phones to school must keep them in their backpacks at all times while on campus.  If a student does not follow this rule, the phone will be turned over to the Director of the Lower School, and parents can pick it up at the Lower School desk at the end of the school day.  Repeated infractions will lead to loss of the privilege.

Eating and Drinking

Early Childhood and Kindergarten students eat snacks and lunch as directed by teachers in the classrooms. Students in Grades 1-5 eat snack as directed by teachers in the classrooms and lunch in the dining room. Eating is prohibited in all areas other than these.

Internet Use

Students are encouraged and at times required to use the internet for study and research. Certain sites are restricted from use in the school building. The Acceptable Use Policy will be signed by students before the student has permission to use the internet or the school network.
Grades 1-3 Technology Guidelines
Grades 4-5 Technology Guidelines

Personal Belongings

Students should place coats and belongings in cubbies. Items of value should be left at home.

Personal Safety

Students are expected to inform an adult member of the faculty, staff, or administration if they believe that their safety or the safety of another student is in question or at risk. If a student seeks help for herself or someone else, confidentiality will be maintained.

Public Spaces

All of the rooms and common areas at Lincoln School are shared spaces. It is each individual's responsibility to use these areas respectfully. Therefore, students are expected to:

  • pick up after themselves when they leave any room or common area;
  • be mindful of the volume of their voices;
  • eat ONLY in the designated areas

Uniform

Nursery and Pre-Kindergarten

Students are encouraged to come to school in simple, sensible, comfortable clothing that can get dirty.

Kindergarten

Monday through Thursday, girls are encouraged to come to school in simple, sensible and comfortable clothing. On Friday, Lincoln School dress code kilt or jumper is required.

Grades 1-5

Monday - Thursday

1. Collared Shirts/Turtlenecks- Students are required to wear collared shirts or turtlenecks (black, navy blue, or white) to school every day. T-shirts are not permitted.

2. Kilts/Pants- Students are required to wear either the Lincoln kilt or jumper (with shorts or spandex) or khaki colored, cotton twill pants to school (only Monday through Thursday).

3.  Socks/Hosiery - Students may wear socks of any color. Tights must be solid black, navy blue, gray or white with no pattern or design.

4. Shoes- Students may wear sneakers or closed toe shoes with soles (any color). Boots (including high top Uggs) may be worn to school but must be removed by the start of morning meeting.

5. Sweaters/Jackets- Students may wear unadorned sweaters, cardigans or jackets in black, navy blue, white, or gray.

6. Sweatshirts- Students may only wear sweatshirts only that have a Lincoln logo.

7. Jewelry: Must be minimal and unobtrusive.

8. Hats and bandanas are not allowed (except for headscarves worn for religious purposes).

Friday

All students must come to school in the Lincoln Kilt, a collared shirt or turtleneck, black or brown shoes (flats- no heels, no sneakers), and black, navy blue, gray or white tights or ankle/knee-high socks. No mid-calf socks. tighs and socks must be solid with no pattern or design.

Lower School PE Attire

Students will be expected to change into their sneakers in the gym at the beginning of class.  Gym shorts may be worn under uniforms and uniforms can be removed for class.  Lower School students will be expected to leave a pair of sneakers at school.

Conferences, Reports and Grades

There are four reporting times for Early Childhood through Grade 5. The first is a parent-teacher conference 6 - 8 weeks after the beginning of the school year. The second is a written report at the end of the first term. The third is a conference in March. The fourth is a written report in early June. In addition to these regularly scheduled reporting times, either the parents or the school may request a conference to discuss specific issues. On the two days when conferences are scheduled, there are no classes for the students.
Grades are not used in Lower School until the second half of the fifth grade. Rather, the School provides detailed reports to convey to parents their child's progress in relation to potential.

Extended Day Program

The school runs an Extended Day Program for students in Early Childhood through Grade 5 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on each school day. The fee for this service may be paid annually or billed monthly for day-to-day use.

Enrichment Programs

Lincoln School offers special after school programs such as ballet, cooking, ceramics and jazz for Lower School students from Early Childhood through Grade Five. Winter and Spring vacation camps are also available for all Lower School students. A variety of summer camps such as tennis, field hockey, lacrosse, writing and acting are offered for ages three through fourteen. 

Field Trips

Parents sign a general permission slip for field trips with the back-to-school paperwork.  When field trips are planned, the teacher in charge will send home a letter with details about the trip.

Snacks, Lunch and the Dining Room

Nursery, Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Students
Students in full day Nursery, Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten are asked to bring a nutritious lunch daily. The Early Childhood classes have lunch together in their classrooms.

Snacks for Early Childhood children are provided by Lincoln School.

Lunch for students Grades 1-5
Starting in Grade One, students eat with their respective classes in the Dining Room. Our all-school lunch program is provided to all students in grades one through five. Girls may make selections from the Dining Room. Lunch menus are posted on the school's website. Click on Lynxnet and then Sage Dining Services Weekly Menu.
Snacks for students in Grades 1-5           
We ask your daughters to bring at least one nutritious snack each day to school. Students will have an opportunity to enjoy their snacks during recess each morning. If your child attends the Extended Day Program a second snack is also advised.

Celebrations

Treats in Lower School
Students are welcome to bring birthday treats to share with other members of the class. Please adhere to the school's Peanut/Tree Nut Policy when planning the snack.  Parents should let the classroom teacher know if they are providing a special snack and bring the necessary utensils and paper goods.

Parties Outside of School

To be the only one, or one of a very few in a class, not invited to join a party can be a devastating experience for a child. If a family plans a party outside of school, the school asks that they invite either a handful of their daughter's classmates (less than half the class) or the entire class.

If a party occurs after school and the entire class is not invited, students should follow their regular dismissal routine and not carpool to the party, to be sensitive to those not invited. 

Invitations and Gifts

Invitations and birthday gifts should NEVER be sent to school. 


Celebration Books
Through the Celebration Books Program, parents may donate a book to the library in honor of their child's birthday. A book plate in the book records the occasion and the donor.  Please contact Meagan Lenihan, the Lower School librarian, at ext. 3135 if you wish to participate in this program.

Homework

Homework is an extension of classroom work. Parents can best help by being supportive, expressing interest, and offering encouragement. If your child is confused about a homework assignment, we encourage her to seek help from her teacher the following morning. Parents should be sensitive to the varying nature of a child's assignment and use good judgment in evaluating each situation on its own merit. Parents should not hesitate to consult the teacher by calling the school, leaving a message on voice mail, or emailing when there is uncertainty about an assignment.

Lower School Library-Moorehouse Room

The Lower School Library is open during school hours. All students are welcome to visit the library whenever they have free time and/or permission from their teacher. Flexible scheduling allows classes to visit the library as needed.
Library resources are not available for use during the Extended Day Program.
Students in Early Childhood are not eligible to borrow books, but their parents are welcome to check out books on their behalf. Although the circulation period is one week, students may renew their books as often as necessary.


Lost Books
Although there are no fines for late books, the minimum charge for each book unreturned or damaged beyond reasonable wear is $20. The cost of unreturned paperback fiction is $5. A higher charge will be made for the replacement of more expensive materials.

Recess

A recess is held each morning for free play and snacks.

Telephone Calls

No telephone calls between parents and students should take place during the school day, except in case of illness or other emergencies. A student urgently needing to call home may do so from the Lower School Office with the permission of her teacher or the Lower School Administrative Assistant. We do not allow students to make social arrangements on the school telephone. These should be taken care of at home. Cell phones are not allowed at school.

Valuables

All valuables, including tape/CD players, computers, and money should not be brought to school unless approved by the school.  Although we allow the Lower School students to carry cell phones in their backpacks for use outside of school/off school grounds, we recommend this only if necessary.

Lower School Events

Battle of the Books

Fourth graders from Lincoln, Wheeler/Hamilton, Gordon and St. Michael’s Schools will cooperate in testing their memories of forty children’s books by answering detailed questions posed by their librarians.  The children are assigned to mixed teams; each team has members from all four schools.  We organize the program in this non-competitive way so that although one team will emerge victorious, each school will be well represented on the winning team.

The Battle of the Books follows a quiz show format.  The moderator will ask a question to each team in turn, and team members will confer with each other before answering.  In order to qualify to be a member of the book team, students are required to read at least ten books from the list.  

Black and Orange Day

Instead of costumes on Halloween, students who choose to dress up do so in black and orange.  We spare scaring ourselves and enjoy each other’s inventiveness.  Please, no hair dye or make-up.    

The Book Fair

The Book Fair is an event that celebrates reading!  It is held in early March, on the day before and day of Parent Teacher Conferences.  Children in Grades K-5 visit the Book Fair with their classes; younger students are welcome to visit the Book Fair with a parent or other designated adult.  It is open from 8:00-3:30.  The vendor, Best Book Fairs, offers a wonderful selection of books for children and young adults.

Book Character Day

Book Character Day occurs on the Thursday of the Book Fair. The children come to school dressed as their favorite book characters. We will also hold a “Book Character Parade” so we have a chance to many fantastic characters wandering our halls!

Bravo Arts Showcase - The Arts Showcase is an annual week a Lincoln in celebration of the art our students are creating. An exhibition of students’ visual art is on display, hung by parent volunteers, and includes one or two pieces from every student that is currently taking a class. Also, over the three concerts during those days, each student performing in a musical ensemble performs for the community. 

Class Coffees

The Lower School Director and the school’s consulting psychologist host class coffees for each grade level.  Typically, the psychologist gives a short presentation on developmental milestones, or another topic of interest, of the age group and then opens up the forum to questions and discussions.

Closing Ceremonies

On the last day of school for Lower School, the Lower School gathers to celebrate the graduation of the fifth grade.  All students in Kindergarten through Grade 5 attend.  All parents are welcome, and parents of Early Childhood students are welcome to bring their Oak or Ginkgo child as well.

Conference Days

In late October and early March, Lower School holds Parent-Teacher Conferences.  There is no school for Lower School students on these days, although there is childcare for the duration of the conference.

Day of Service

During the third week of May, the school holds a service day.  Each class in Lower School works on a project, and we also reflect on what we did and why we participate.  The LSPA sponsors an all-school barbeque in the afternoon, beginning at dismissal and held on the lawn of Dwight House.

Family Dance

The Lower School Family Dance is a fun-filled evening sponsored by the LSPA and held in the Wheeler Gym.  A DJ keeps the children (and willing parents) moving, and refreshments are served.  The children dress up, but “dressed up” varies from child-to-child; some girls wear more casual outfits and some wear party clothes.  Practice “The Locomotion” and come on out and hit the floor! 

Field Day

Field Day is a much-anticipated event.  Students in K-5 are assigned to color teams and participate in a variety of team events, which seventh grade students coordinate and supervise under the eyes of the PE teachers.  A barbeque lunch follows.  Field Day is held at Faxon Farm or, in the case of rain, the Boss Gym.

Grandparents and Special Friends Day

We welcome these special visitors for a full morning of activity.   Visitors participate in activities in the classroom, visit the Art Show, and attend an assembly with their grandchild/special child.  School dismisses at noon on this day, and lunch is not served.  There is no Extended Day on this day.

Lincoln Benefit

Each year Lincoln holds a gala to benefit financial aid.   The evening includes a dinner, silent auction, live auction, and dancing. 

Morgan Stone Day

Morgan Stone was a long-time student at Lincoln and served as a leader of 2B1, our school's multicultural club. She graduated in the spring of 2000 and, unfortunately, died a few months later. Since then, Lincoln's annual celebration of "Morgan Stone Day" has commemorated Morgan's spirit and her dedication to issues of diversity and equity. We take this opportunity at the beginning of each year to renew our commitment to creating a community that is inclusive and equitable for all.   The Lower School typically attends an assembly on this day.

Parent Night

On an evening in mid-September, parents join us in the evening for a presentation by their child’s teacher on the curriculum and special events of that grade level.

Picture Day

On this day in September, students have individual portraits taken as well as a class picture.  Packages are available for purchase.

Red, White, and Pink Day

Valentine’s Day is known as Red, White and Pink Day in Lower School and is an out-of-uniform day.  The students dress stylishly, or gaudily, in shades of the three colors, and the effect is a sight to behold!  Hair dying and face painting are not allowed, however.

The Rooster Games

This event is a yearly gathering between Lincoln, Sophia Academy and Wheeler Schoos.  The schools are brought together after reading a list of books that are nominees for the Rhode Island Children’s Book Award.  The students spend a great deal of time reading these twenty books in preparation for the games. 

The games are set up in a non-competitive way. Each of the students is assigned to a mixed team of members from all schools. The games will consist of many different components; matching author with title, title with first line of the book, multiple choice questions, matching an object to  a book, designing posters and making up chants. 

The Rooster Games is a day of fun and excitement sparked by reading a great selection of fiction and non-fiction titles.  All look forward to this celebration!

Under the Beech Tree Picnic

Despite its name, the Beech Tree Picnic is an event for Oak and Ginkgo families!  Held on an evening just before the end of the school year, the picnic takes place under the Beech Tree.  Families bring a blanket and dinner, and we all enjoy each other’s company before we disperse for the summer months.

Valentine’s Sing

Under the direction of the music teacher, Grades 1 and 2 perform a lively show that includes singing and comedy.

Variety Show

The Variety Show is organized by a parent who wanted to give back to Lower School and offered her expertise in this area.  Participants are in Grades K-5, although all families are welcome to attend.  Children develop an act – acts range from comedy to dancing – and also have the opportunity to be in a group number.  Those who don’t want to perform can be “stagehands” and are in charge of advertising and other needed tasks.

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Table of Contents

Mission Statement
Statement on Diversity
Our Quaker Heritage and Traditions
Basic Tenets of Lincoln School

  • Integrity of the Individual
  • Affirmation of Community Values
  • Disrespect and Harrassment
  • Stealing
  • Possession of Threatening Objects

School Identity

  • School Motto
  • School Mascot
  • School Name

Campus and Facilities

  • Campuses
  • Lincoln Store
  • Business Office
  • Libraries
  • Dining Room

Health Services and Campus Safety

  • Health Form
  • Health Policy
  • Illness
  • Illness during School
  • Drugs, Illegal Substances and Alcohol
  • Emergencies
  • Emergency Procedures

Snow Days or Emergency Dismissal

Transportation

  • Bicycles
  • Cars
  • Parking
  • Drop-Off/Pick-Up

Development and Alumnae Relations

  • Ways to get involved
  • Special Projects and Endowment
  • Planned Giving
  • Alumnae Relations
  • Staff and Contact Information

Parents Working with Schools and
Schools Working with Parents

  • Parents Working with Schools
  • Schools Working with Parents

Lincoln School Parents Association

  • Mission
  • Organization
  • Programs and Activities
  • Division Coordinators
  • Class Representative
  • Volunteer Opportunities
  • Parents Away from Home
  • Parent-Hosted Parties and Social Gatherings
  • Parent Partnership

Uniform and Dress Code for Middle and Upper Schools

  • Dress Code
  • Dress Code Violations
  • Physical Education Attire

Upper School

  • Academic Policies
  • Add/Drop Policy
  • Academic Standards
  • Integrity: A Statement of Academic Honesty
  • Academic Reporting
  • Attendance
  • Off-Campus Privileges
  • Behavior in the Community
  • Disciplinary Procedures
  • Physical Education
  • Upper School Athletic Handbook
  • Library Policy
  • Organizations

Middle School

  • Cell Phone Policy
  • Internet Use
  • Messages
  • Personal Belongings
  • Public Spaces
  • Uniform
  • Advisors
  • Afternoon Programs
  • Attendance
  • Conferences, Reports, and Grades
  • Discipline
  • Homework
  • Sports
  • Trips
  • Arrival and Dismissal
  • Attendance
  • Cell Phones
  • Eating and Drinking
  • Internet Use
  • Personal Belongings
  • Personal Safety
  • Public Spaces
  • Uniform and PE Attire
  • Conferences, Reports, and Grades
  • Extended Day Program
  • Enrichment Programs
  • Field Trips
  • Snacks, Lunch, and the Dining Room
  • Celebrations
  • Homeowrk
  • Lower School Library
  • Telephone Calls
  • Valuables
  • Descriptions of Lower School Events

 

 

 

 


© 2008 Lincoln School | 301 Butler Avenue | Providence, RI 02906 | Ph: (401) 331 9696 | Fax: (401) 751 6670 
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