Graduates of single-sex education rate themselves much higher in intellectual self-confidence, writing ability, and public speaking ability, all skills that are vital to success in education and beyond.

Leadership

Lincoln school head Suzanne Fogarty is a strong advocate for interdisciplinary learning, global education, and community partnerships, spearheading our relationships with Brown, RISD, Save the Bay, and World Leadership School. Before joining Lincoln, she served as head of Berkeley Carroll’s Upper School. Suzanne also taught in the Lower School at St. Ann’s School and the Brearley School. She is currently on the board of the Association of Independent Schools in New England and the board of Sophia Academy.

Thoughts from the head of school...

Friends,

The new school year is upon us and we are very much looking forward to welcoming our community back to campus.

As we know, the world does not stop once the summer begins. And this summer has had its share of events. In fact, as an educator, it can be an odd feeling when big events occur and we are not in our Lincoln classrooms to process them together. And yet, this is the way of the world—things are always happening and they are happening at warp speed. 

Thankfully, at Lincoln School we make the space to take deep breaths and think together, listen together, and just be together. Last week, we welcomed faculty and staff back to school and soon after our opening meetings, we gathered together at the Providence Meeting House to sit in collective silence as colleagues and as a teaching community. And this upcoming Friday, per annual tradition, students and faculty from the lower, middle, and upper divisions will sit together on the Dwight House lawn for our first all-school silent meeting of the year. 

Taking pause in the frenetic world in which we live can be a challenge for all of us. Our Quaker foundation reminds us to embrace simplicity and to be appreciative for what we have and whom we have around us—the Lincoln community.

We live in a complex and often unjust world, where flood waters in Texas, Bangladesh, and Niger have displaced thousands of people, where hate speech and violence were the results of white supremacists and neo-Nazi marchers gathered in Charlottesville, where James Damore, author of the Google Manifesto, falsely claims that biology prevents women from being coders, and the long list goes on.

Our challenge, Lincoln’s challenge, the challenge of schools everywhere, is to provide a space where community members can share their thoughts and opinions, frustrations, confusion, hopes, and ambitions to improve a world in much need of their bold minds and big hearts. 

Education is a marathon, not a sprint. At Lincoln, the empowerment of girls and young women is at the heart of our mission, and the new banners on Butler Avenue and Blackstone Boulevard remind all who drive by that Lincoln students are the bold minds, global thinkers, creative problem solvers, and future leaders of our world. 

In closing, I would like to share a note that we received a couple of weeks ago from one of our alumnae, a member of the class of 1932. Somehow, reading this note puts everything into perspective. 

August 18th, 2017
I have had a good life and I feel that the Lincoln School contributed to it. I was born Sept. 17, 1915 so will soon be 102 years old. I still live in my own home (have part-time help)—am not allowed to drive anymore. I go to church each Sunday and am still pretty active. My children are close and visit me often. I have 74 blood descendants and am proud of all of them!! I lost one daughter and one granddaughter to cancer—the rest all healthy. I thank the Lord each day. 
Best regards, Helen Esther Kenoyer Mosher ’32


We are so grateful that Helen Esther Kenoyer Mosher ’32 shared these thoughts with us and that Lincoln impacted her life in a positive way. Sharing this letter with our community is a wonderful reminder of the gift of a Lincoln education. We look forward to seeing you soon and to a great year. 

All my best,
Suzanne


Education is a marathon, not a sprint. At Lincoln, the empowerment of girls and young women is at the heart of our mission, and the new banners on Butler Avenue and Blackstone Boulevard remind all who drive by that Lincoln students are the bold minds, global thinkers, creative problem solvers, and future leaders of our world. 

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As the head of Lincoln, people sometimes ask me: “Why all girls?” The distilled answer is: the purpose of Lincoln’s mission is to empower girls and young women, and when it comes to education, research shows it doesn’t pay to be gender blind.

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Exciting things are already afoot this year at Lincoln! I’m pleased to share that on New Year’s Day I was included in an incredible lineup of Rhode Islanders who were named “R.I. Innovators: 11 Trailblazers to Follow in 2017” by the Providence Journal. It is thanks to the collaborative work of the Lincoln School community that I received this honor.

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As a Quaker school for girls, our foundation allows us to provide a space in which to have productive conversations about our personal beliefs without excluding others. Today, as all days, we are a community committed to peace, equity, and inclusion. 

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I’m pleased to share that we are nearing the completion of our Facilities Master Plan that we began in earnest last winter. A Board of Trustees committee led the collaborative process in which the needs of the community directly influenced the 10-year plan for our campus.

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